10 according to the prologue, how many tales will each pilgrim tell on the journey? Ideas

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Summary and Analysis
The Prologue

Summary

One spring day, the Narrator of The Canterbury Tales rents a room at the Tabard Inn before he recommences his journey to Canterbury. That evening, a group of people arrive at the inn, all of whom are also going to Canterbury to receive the blessings of “the holy blissful martyr,” St. Thomas à Becket. Calling themselves “pilgrims” because of their destination, they accept the Narrator into their company. The Narrator describes his newfound traveling companions.

The Host at the inn, Harry Bailey, suggests that, to make the trip to Canterbury pass more pleasantly, each member of the party tell two tales on the journey to Canterbury and two more tales on the journey back. The person who tells the best story will be rewarded with a sumptuous dinner paid for by the other members of the party. The Host decides to accompany the pilgrims to Canterbury and serve as the judge of the tales.

Analysis

The primary function of these opening lines is to provide a physical setting and the motivation for the Canterbury pilgrimage. Chaucer’s original plan, to have each pilgrim tell two stories on the way to Canterbury and two more on the way back, was never completed; we have tales only on the way to Canterbury. In The Prologue are portraits of all levels of English life. The order of the portraits is important because it provides a clue as to the social standing of the different occupations. The pilgrims presented first are representative of the highest social rank, with social rank descending with every new pilgrim introduced.

Highest in the social rank are representatives of the aristocracy or those with pretensions toward nobility. First in this group are the Knight and his household, including the Squire. The second group within those of the highest social standing includes the Prioress, the Monk, and the Friar, who ought to be of the lower class, but who, as a pious beggar, has begged so well that his prosperity ironically slips him into the company of the nobles. Of these pilgrims, probably only the Knight and his son, the Squire, qualify as true aristocrats, both outwardly and inwardly. The “gentilesse” — refinement resulting from good breeding — of the Prioress and the Monk is largely external and affected.

Following this class are pilgrims whose high social rank is mainly derived from commercial wealth. Included in this group are the Merchant, who illegally made much of his money from selling French coins (a practice that was forbidden in England at the time); the Sergeant of Law, who made his fortune by using his knowledge as a lawyer to buy up foreclosed property for practically nothing; the Clerk, who belongs with this group of pilgrims because of his gentle manners and extensive knowledge of books; and the Franklin, who made enough money to become a country gentleman and is in a position to push for a noble station. (It is evident both from the relationship of the Franklin’s portrait to that of the guildsmen, presented next, and from Harry Bailey’s scornful remarks to him, however, that he is not yet of the noble class).

The next class of pilgrims is the guildsmen, consisting of men who belong to something similar to specialized unions of craftsmen guilds. Among this group of specialized laborers are the Haberdasher, the Dyer, the Carpenter, the Weaver, and the Tapestry-Maker. None of them tell a tale.

A middle-class group of pilgrims comprises the next lower position of social rank. First presented in this group is the Cook, whom we might consider out of place — ranked too high — but who, as a master of his trade, is greatly respected by his fellow travelers. Also included in this social class are the Shipman, because of his immense knowledge of and travels throughout the world, and the Physician, a doctor of medicine (a career that was less revered in the Middle Ages than it is now). The Wife of Bath, who is the last of this group to be presented, is included in this group because of her knowledge and deportment and her many other pilgrimages.

The Parson and the Plowman comprise the next group of pilgrims, the virtuous poor or lower class. Each, although very poor, represents all of the Christian virtues.

The last group of pilgrims include those of the immoral lower class. Among this group of pilgrims are the Manciple, who profits from buying food for the lawyers in the Inns of Court, and the vulgar Miller, who steals from his customers. The Reeve tells dirty stories and cheats his trusting young master, and the corrupt Summoner takes bribes. Last, and most corrupt in this litany of undesirables is the Pardoner, who sells false pardons and fake relics.

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The Prologue – Cliffs Notes

The Prologue - Cliffs Notes

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  • Sumary: Summary One spring day, the Narrator of The Canterbury Tales rents a room at the Tabard Inn before he recommences his journey to Canterbury. That even

  • Matching Result: Chaucer’s original plan, to have each pilgrim tell two stories on the way to Canterbury and two more on the way back, was never completed; we have tales …

  • Intro: The Prologue Summary and Analysis The Prologue Summary One spring day, the Narrator of The Canterbury Tales rents a room at the Tabard Inn before he recommences his journey to Canterbury. That evening, a group of people arrive at the inn, all of whom are also going to Canterbury to receive the…
  • Source: https://www.cliffsnotes.com/literature/c/the-canterbury-tales/summary-and-analysis/the-prologue

According To The Prologue, How Many Tales Will Each …

According To The Prologue, How Many Tales Will Each ...

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  • Sumary: According To The Prologue How Many Tales Will Each Pilgrim Tell On The Journey?? He lays out his plan: each of the pilgrims will tell … Read more

  • Matching Result: Chaucer’s original plan to have each pilgrim tell two stories on the way to Canterbury and two more on the way back was never completed we have …

  • Intro: According To The Prologue, How Many Tales Will Each Pilgrim Tell On The Journey? – Micro B LifeThe original intenent was that each pilgrim was to tell two tales to Canterbury and two on the way back for a free meal that would have been an estimated 120 tales-instead of…
  • Source: https://www.microblife.in/according-to-the-prologue-how-many-tales-will-each-pilgrim-tell-on-the-journey/

The Canterbury Tales: General Prologue & Frame … – Shmoop

The Canterbury Tales: General Prologue & Frame ... - Shmoop

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  • Sumary: A free summary of The Canterbury Tales: General Prologue & Frame Story by Geoffrey Chaucer. A fun and humorous chapter by chapter summary broken into tasty tidbits that you can digest.

  • Matching Result: The pilgrims go to dinner, during which the owner of the tavern, or Host, makes a proposal to the group: on the way to Canterbury, says the Host, each pilgrim …

  • Intro: The Canterbury Tales: General Prologue & Frame Story Summary | Shmoop Previous Next The Canterbury Tales: General Prologue & Frame Story SummaryThe action begins at a tavern just outside of London, circa 1390, where a group of pilgrims have gathered in preparation for their journey to visit the shrine of…
  • Source: https://www.shmoop.com/study-guides/literature/canterbury-tales-prologue/summary

The Canterbury Tales: General Prologue & Frame … – Shmoop

The Canterbury Tales: General Prologue & Frame ... - Shmoop

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  • Sumary: Find out what happens in our General Prologue summary for The Canterbury Tales: General Prologue & Frame Story by Geoffrey Chaucer. This free study guide is stuffed with the juicy…

  • Matching Result: The host proposes that each pilgrim tell two tales on the way to Canterbury, and two on the way back. Whoever tells the best tale as judged by the Host wins …

  • Intro: The Canterbury Tales: General Prologue & Frame Story General Prologue | Shmoop Advertisement – Guide continues below Previous Next General Prologue The General Prologue begins with a description of how April’s showers cause flowers to bloom, crops to grow, birds to sing, and people to want to make pilgrimages –…
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The Canterbury Tales – Wikipedia

The Canterbury Tales - Wikipedia

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  • Sumary: A woodcut from William Caxton’s second edition of The Canterbury Tales printed in 1483

  • Matching Result: In the General Prologue, some 30 pilgrims are introduced. According to the Prologue, Chaucer’s intention was to write four stories from the perspective of each …

  • Intro: The Canterbury Tales The Canterbury Tales A woodcut from William Caxton’s second edition of The Canterbury Tales printed in 1483AuthorGeoffrey ChaucerOriginal titleTales of CaunterburyCountryEnglandLanguageMiddle EnglishSet inKingdom of England, 14th centuryPublication datec. 1400 (unfinished at Chaucer’s death)Dewey Decimal821.1LC ClassPR1870 .A1TextThe Canterbury Tales at Wikisource The Canterbury Tales (Middle English: Tales of Caunterbury)[2] is a…
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General Prologue – Wikipedia

General Prologue - Wikipedia

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  • Matching Result: The General Prologue is the first part of The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer. It introduces the frame story, in which a group of pilgrims travelling …

  • Intro: General Prologue Illustration of the knight from the General Prologue. Three lines of text are also shown. The Tabard Inn, Southwark, around 1850 The General Prologue is the first part of The Canterbury Tales by Geoffrey Chaucer. It introduces the frame story, in which a group of pilgrims travelling to…
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Frequently Asked Questions About according to the prologue, how many tales will each pilgrim tell on the journey?

If you have questions that need to be answered about the topic according to the prologue, how many tales will each pilgrim tell on the journey?, then this section may help you solve it.

How many Canterbury tales did each pilgrim narrate?

The Prologue states that Chaucer intended to write four stories—two for each pilgrim—from their point of view, two each on the way to and from their final destination, St. Thomas Becket’s shrine (for a total of about 120 stories).

How many stories will be told in the General Prologue and the tales by each character?

two tales

How many pilgrims appear in The Canterbury Tales Prologue?

Geoffrey Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales, which was written in Middle English at the end of the 14th century, tells the tale of a group of 31 pilgrims who meet while traveling from the Tabard Inn in Southwark to the shrine of St. Thomas Becket in Canterbury.

How many tales will each traveler share en route back to London?

Harry Bailey, the host of the Tabard, decides to join them and act as their leader; each pilgrim will tell four stories — two each on the way there, two each on the way back (one hundred and twenty — a “great hundred” — stories)

Which characters tell the Canterbury Tales’ how many stories?

Geoffrey Chaucer (c. 1343–1400 CE) wrote a collection of 24 tales titled The Canterbury Tales (c. 1388–1400 CE) that spans a variety of literary genres and touches on topics like fate, God’s will, love, marriage, pride, and death.

What is the total number of miles that each pilgrim will travel?

Where are the pilgrims going in the Prologue? How many tales will each pilgrim tell on the journey—two going there and two coming back—are stated in the Prologue?

If the pilgrims had been able to tell two tales on their way to Canterbury and another two on their way back to England, how many tales would they have been able to tell?

Most pilgrims only tell one story, and The Canterbury Tales ends abruptly with the parson’s sermon and Chaucer’s Retraction. The pilgrims agree to tell four stories each, two on the way to Canterbury and two on the way back.

Why do the Canterbury Tales contain only 24 tales?

Sadly, only 24 of the pilgrims’ stories were completed by the time Chaucer passed away in 1400, and the work (?The Canterbury Tales? )omits the pilgrims’ return journey from Canterbury.

How many tales should each traveler share?

How does Chaucer himself fit into the group? He is the anonymous Narrator, and each traveler will tell four stories: two on the way to Canterbury and two on the way back.

Which pilgrim will share his or her story first, and how will they decide?

The Host reminds the pilgrims of their agreement and suggests that they draw straws to determine who goes first. The Knight draws the shortest straw, and the tale-telling competition begins at the watering hole of Saint Thomas.

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