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an’s Democracy [ushistory.org]

Politics and the New Nation

23b. The Expansion of the Vote: A White Man’s Democracy

Frances Wright
Frances Wright visited the U.S. from Europe. She wrote of the new American Republic: “Women are assuming their place as thinking beings, not in despite of the men, but chiefly in consequence of their enlarged views and exertions as fathers and legislators.”

The rise of political parties as the fundamental organizing unit of the Second (Two) Party System represented a sharp break from the values that had shaped Republican and Federalist political competition. Leaders in the earlier system remained deeply suspicious that parties could corrupt and destroy the young republic. At the heart of the new legitimacy of parties, and their forthright celebration of democracy, was the dramatic expansion of voting rights for white men.

Immediately after the Revolution most states retained some property requirements that prevented poor people from voting. Following republican logic, citizens were believed to need an economic stake in society in order to be trusted to vote wisely. If a voter lacked economic independence, then it seemed that those who controlled his livelihood could easily manipulate his vote.

Ironically, just as industrial wage labor began to create dependent laborers on a large new scale, the older republican commitment to propertied voters fell out of favor. As property requirements for voting were abolished, economic status disappeared as a foundation for citizenship. By 1840 more than 90 percent of adult white men possessed the right to vote.

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Not only that, voters could now cast their opinion for more offices. Previously, governors and presidential electors had usually been selected by state legislatures as part of a republican strategy that limited the threat of direct democratic control over the highest political offices. The growing democratic temper of the first decades of the 19th century changed this and increasingly all offices were chosen by direct vote. The United States was the world leader in allowing popular participation in elections. This triumph of American politics built upon, but also expanded, the egalitarian ideals of the American Revolution.

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This democratic triumph, however, also had sharp limitations that today seem quite shocking. At the same time that state legislatures opened suffrage (that is, the right to vote) to all white men, they simultaneously closed the door firmly on white women and free African Americans. This movement was especially disappointing since it represented a retreat from a broader sense of political rights that had been included in some early state constitutions.

Election of 1820
James Monroe nearly shut out his Presidential opponent, John Quincy Adams in the election of 1820. Monroe beat Adams 231 to 1 with 3 abstentions (electoral college votes).

For example, New Jersey revised its state constitution to abolish property requirements in 1807, but at the same time prevented all women from voting (even wealthy ones who had been allowed to vote there since 1776) as well as all free blacks. New York acted similarly in 1821 when its legislature extended the franchise to almost all white men, but simultaneously created high property requirements for free blacks. As a result, only 68 of the 13,000 free African Americans in New York City could vote in 1825. When Pennsylvania likewise denied free blacks the right to vote in the late 1830s, a state legislator explained that “The people of this state are for continuing this commonwealth, what it has always been, a political community of white persons.” While he was correct about the prevailing racist sentiment among white voters, free blacks with property had not been excluded from the franchise by the earlier Revolutionary state constitution.

Tragically, the democratization of American politics to include nearly universal white manhood suffrage also intensified discrimination by race and gender. The idea of total democracy remained too radical for full implementation.

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23b. The Expansion of the Vote: A White Man's Democracy

23b. The Expansion of the Vote: A White Man's Democracy

  • Author: ushistory.org

  • Rating: 3⭐ (307874 rating)

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  • Sumary: The Expansion of the Vote: A White Man’s Democracy

  • Matching Result: James Monroe nearly shut out his Presidential opponent, John Quincy Adams in the election of 1820. Monroe beat Adams 231 to 1 with 3 abstentions (electoral …

  • Intro: A White Man’s Democracy [ushistory.org] 23b. The Expansion of the Vote: A White Man’s Democracy Frances Wright visited the U.S. from Europe. She wrote of the new American Republic: “Women are assuming their place as thinking beings, not in despite of the men, but chiefly in consequence of their enlarged…
  • Source: https://www.ushistory.org/us/23b.asp

Voting Rights: A Short History

Voting Rights: A Short History

  • Author: carnegie.org

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  • Sumary: The struggle for equal voting rights dates to the earliest days of U.S. history. Now, after a period of bipartisan efforts to expand enfranchisement, Americans once again face new obstacles to voting

  • Matching Result: The landmark Voting Rights Act of 1965 passed by Congress took major steps to curtail voter suppression. Thus began a new era of push-and-pull on voting rights, …

  • Intro: Voting Rights: A Short History | Voting | Carnegie Corporation of New YorkThe struggle for equal voting rights dates to the earliest days of U.S. history. Now, after a period of bipartisan efforts to expand enfranchisement, Americans once again face new obstacles to voting By Carnegie Corporation of New York…
  • Source: https://www.carnegie.org/our-work/article/voting-rights-timeline/

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Suffrage Classes and Party Alignments: A Study in Voter … – jstor

Suffrage Classes and Party Alignments: A Study in Voter ... - jstor

  • Author: jstor.org

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  • Sumary: Richard P. McCormick, Suffrage Classes and Party Alignments: A Study in Voter Behavior, The Mississippi Valley Historical Review, Vol. 46, No. 3 (Dec., 1959), pp. 397-410

  • Matching Result: by RP McCormick · 1959 · Cited by 39 — The traditional ingredients of American political history have been personalities, classes, sections, parties, and issues. The voter, except in so far as he …

  • Intro: A Study in Voter Behavior on JSTOR This is a preview. Log in to get access Preview Journal Information In October, 1907 seven of the leading historical societies of the Mississippi Valley were invited to Lincoln, Nebraska “for the purpose of considering plans for effecting a permanent organization for the…
  • Source: https://www.jstor.org/stable/1892266

Timeline of voting rights in the United States – Wikipedia

Timeline of voting rights in the United States - Wikipedia

  • Author: en.wikipedia.org

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  • Sumary: This is a timeline of voting rights in the United States. The timeline highlights milestones when groups of people in the United States gained voting rights, and also documents aspects of…

  • Matching Result: This is a timeline of voting rights in the United States. The timeline highlights milestones when groups of people in the United States gained voting rights …

  • Intro: Timeline of voting rights in the United States This is a timeline of voting rights in the United States. The timeline highlights milestones when groups of people in the United States gained voting rights, and also documents aspects of disenfranchisement in the country. Contents 1770s 1780s 1790s 1800s 1830s 1840s…
  • Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timeline_of_voting_rights_in_the_United_States

Frequently Asked Questions About approximately how much of the adult white male population in the united states could vote by 1840?

If you have questions that need to be answered about the topic approximately how much of the adult white male population in the united states could vote by 1840?, then this section may help you solve it.

In the 1820s, how were voting rights increased?

Voting rights were increased in the 1820s by the majority of states relaxing their voting requirements, which led to a rise in the number of voters. Fewer states required property ownership to vote, so more people were able to cast ballots.

Quiz: How did voting laws change in 1828?

The majority of states had changed their voting laws by 1828 to grant the right to vote to all white men.

In the United States, when was universal suffrage for white men achieved?

The 1840s saw the implementation of universal suffrage for white men in the wake of Jacksonian democracy’s success; the Dec.

How had the 1828 election affected the composition of the American electorate?

With the continued expansion of the right to vote to most white men, the election marked a dramatic expansion of the electorate, with 9.5% of Americans casting a vote for president, compared with 3.4% in 1824. Jackson prevailed in the South and the West, helped in part by the passage of the Tariff of 1828.

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Those eligible to vote in 1820?

By the end of the 1820s, attitudes and state laws had changed in favor of universal white male suffrage. Maryland passes a law to allow Jews to vote. The 1828 presidential election was the first in which non-property-holding white males could cast a ballot in the vast majority of states.

Quiz: What year did 18-year-olds become eligible to vote?

The 26th Amendment, which lowered the voting age from 21 to 18, was approved in 1971.

What are the US quizlet’s voting requirements?

In order to vote, you must be at least 18 years old, a citizen of the United States, and have proof of residency in the state where you will be casting your ballot.

Why did turnout at the polls rise in 1828?

The data show that Jackson’s popularity played a significant role in the rise in voter turnout and that first-time voters, as measured by the percentage rise in turnout, tended to support Jackson.

What benefits did the right to vote have for white men?

All adult male citizens of a political system are given the right to vote under a form of voting rights known as universal manhood suffrage, regardless of their income, wealth, religion, race, or any other qualification.

When did white men receive universal suffrage in the United States?

With the exception of the military, who were granted the right to vote in 1945, universal male suffrage was granted in 1848. This was supplemented in 1944 by full universal suffrage, which included women as voters. The first democratic elections were held on February 14–16, 1919.

Why is the 1828 election considered the “rising of the common man”?

The Age of Jackson, also known as the Era of The Common Man, began during Andrew Jackson’s presidency because America was now forging its own identity independent of European powers and traditions.

Who was deemed the first commoner or average man president after winning the 1828 election?

The Jacksonian Democracy was established in the 1820s after a protracted and exhausting presidential campaign in which Andrew Jackson defeated incumbent John Quincy Adams in the election of 1828, running as the champion of the common man and a war hero.

How was the election of 1828 regarded as a rise in politics for the people?

The election of 1828 was unique in that it is frequently linked to a rise in popular democracy as more states than ever before loosened property requirements for white males to vote. Jackson’s eventual victory over Adams was hailed as a victory for the “common man” and sparked the so-called Jacksonian Era.

What proportion of voters is there?

The 2019 American Community Survey estimated that there were 54,074,028 people aged 65 and over in the U.S. out of a total population of 328,239,523, or 16.5%, and that voter turnout in the 2020 election was 68.4% for women and 65.0% for men.

Is a vote one that receives a majority of 50%?

In parliamentary procedure, the term “majority” simply means “more than half.” As it relates to a vote, a majority vote is more than half of the votes cast.

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