10 how did events in europe lead to revolution in the spanish colonies Ideas

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the American Revolution

The Revolution Around the World series explores the impact of the American Revolution on the globe and the influence of people from other countries on the Revolutionary era. 

What was happening around the world in 1776? When and why did different countries get involved in the Revolutionary War? What was the impact of the broader American Revolution on those countries? 

Take a closer look as we examine Spain’s role in the American Revolution.

What was happening in Spain in 1776?

In 1776, Spain was almost 20 years into the reign of King Charles III, a member of the royal House of Bourbon. Charles was one of the European rulers who subscribed to Enlightened absolutism. Like Louis XVI in France and Catherine the Great in Russia, he held supreme authority but introduced some of the new ideas about society and progressive government that had emerged in recent philosophy. Like other European countries, Spain was vying for a global empire. Having allied with France in the Seven Years’ (French and Indian) War, Spain lost control of Florida but gained Louisiana in the peace settlement of 1763. People throughout the world, including in many parts of Central and South America, thought of themselves as subjects of – or subject to – the Spanish empire. 

Yelverton Peyton Powder Horn

Captain Yelverton Peyton’s powder horn commemorates the British departure from Havana, Cuba, on July 7, 1763. Peyton, along with nearly 30,000 troops, captured Cuba from Spain on Aug. 14, 1762. Gift of The Landenberger Family Foundation

When did Spain become involved in the American Revolution?

As soon as the American colonies began their rebellion, Spanish officials considered how this new war might benefit their empire. But other priorities and regions competed for Spain’s attention, including in the Spanish-Portuguese War of 1776-1777 over their own North American colonies and borders. That didn’t stop the shipment of arms to America though; some of the first imported weapons purchased by New Englanders came from Spain in 1775. In 1779, Spain signed the Treaty of Aranjuez with France, agreeing to support the French in their war against Great Britain (as part of the American Revolutionary War) in return – assuming a victory – for several former Spanish territories then under British and French control.

Which side did Spain choose, and why?

Spain chose to support the Revolutionaries by allying with France primarily out of global political strategy. Three places played into their thinking: Menorca, an island off the coast of Spain in the Mediterranean; Gibraltar, a point in southern Spain guarding the entrance to the Mediterranean; and the large region of the Mississippi Valley known as Louisiana. In 1776, as the result of centuries of conflict, the British controlled Menorca and Gibraltar – key to Spain’s defense of its coast – and the French held Louisiana – a potentially lucrative source of raw materials. When France agreed to return Louisiana as part of an alliance, Spain entered the War on the Franco-American side.

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The Sortie Made by the Garrison of Gibraltar by John Trumbull

The Sortie Made by the Garrison of Gibraltar by John Trumbull (1789) depicts the events of the night of Nov. 26, 1781, when British troops, long besieged by Spanish forces at Gibraltar, made a sortie, or sudden attack, against the encroaching enemy batteries. At center is the tragic death of the Spanish officer Don Jose de Barboza. The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Who were the key Spanish players in this story?

By far the most famous Spanish figure in the American Revolutionary War was Bernardo Vicente de Gálvez, a Spanish military officer and governor of Spanish Louisiana who orchestrated a series of victories against British forces along the Gulf Coast. Gálvez is one of only eight honorary U.S. citizens, an honor granted for his service in the Revolution. Other Spanish imperial administrators, like Francisco Saavedra de Sangronis, contributed support for the Revolutionary cause, and at sea, naval commanders like Admiral Luis de Córdova damaged British shipping. We know less about thousands of other people in the Spanish empire who contributed to the cause. Some might surprise you, like soldiers serving in racially integrated Spanish units or Petit Jean, an enslaved man whose story was uncovered by historian Kathleen DuVal, who spied and carried messages for the Spanish around Mobile (in present-day Alabama) and who achieved his freedom in the new United States. 

What was the impact of Spain’s involvement?

Along with their military support, Spain supplied the Revolutionaries with desperately needed arms, blankets, shoes, and currency. While Spain’s influence on the Revolutionary War was significant, perhaps the most profound impact was the broader American Revolution’s impact on Spain. A generation after the end of the Revolutionary War, new revolutions emerged in nearly a dozen Spanish colonies in Central and South America. These were led by Libertadores – like Simón Bolívar in Venezuela – who were inspired by new ideas about independence and equality that began during the American Revolution. Their declarations and wars of independence led to the creation of new countries, independent of Spain. 

Diver Even Deeper

  • Related Read the Revolution Recommendations: Read an excerpt from West of the Revolution: An Uncommon History of 1776 by Claudio Saunt about Spanish excursions on the West Coast. Similarly, Kathleen DuVal’s Independence Lost: Lives on the Edge of the American Revolution addresses Spanish land speculation west of the Appalachians as European powers vied for territory on the North American continent. Plus, an excerpt from Thomas Fleming’s The Perils of Peace: America’s Struggle for Survival After Yorktown describes Britain’s continued offensive against the French and Spanish at sea following the British surrender at Yorktown.
  • True Colours Flag Project: Learn more about Spain’s role in the Revolutionary War at sea through the Museum’s True Colours Flag Project, which set out to recreate large flags flown by privateers and navy ships by countries like the United States, France, Britain, Spain, Portugal, and more during the Revolutionary War at sea.
  • Stay tuned for more coming very soon!

Learn More

West of the Revolution by Claudio Saunt

West of the Revolution

Read this excerpt from Claudio Saunt to learn about an ambitious, yet illegal under British law, land scheme to settle a fourteenth colony on the West Coast.

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Independence Lost by Kathleen DuVal

Independence Lost

This excerpt from Kathleen DuVal sets the stage for the American Revolution on the Gulf Coast and tells stories that give international perspectives

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Image 011321 Liberty Tree Photo Credit Bluecadet 0

Virtual Museum Tour

Explore the Museum of the American Revolution’s Virtual Museum Tour to immerse yourself in the history of the nation’s founding through 360-degree panoramic images, high-resolution images of objects and artifacts, and a guided audio tour.

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Spain and the American Revolution

Spain and the American Revolution

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  • Sumary: The Revolution Around the World series explores the impact of the American Revolution on the globe and the influence of people from other countries on the Revolutionary era. 

  • Matching Result: A generation after the end of the Revolutionary War, new revolutions emerged in nearly a dozen Spanish colonies in Central and South America. These were led by …

  • Intro: Spain and the American Revolution The Revolution Around the World series explores the impact of the American Revolution on the globe and the influence of people from other countries on the Revolutionary era. What was happening around the world in 1776? When and why did different countries get involved in the…
  • Source: https://www.amrevmuseum.org/spain-and-the-american-revolution

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Independence from Spanish rule in South America

Independence from Spanish rule in South America

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  • Sumary: Enlightenment ideals of democracy planted the seeds for colonial movements in the Spanish colonies of the Americas.

  • Matching Result: The examples of rebellion in the British Colonies, France, and Spain empowered Latin American revolutionaries who speculated on whether independence was a …

  • Intro: Independence from Spanish rule in South America – Smarthistory Sally James Farnham, Equestrian Portrait of Simón Bolivar, dedicated 1921, bronze, 13 feet 6 inches tall (located at Central Park South and Avenue of the Americas, New York City) photo: David Shankbone, CC BY 2.5 The roots of Independence The extensive Spanish colonies…
  • Source: https://smarthistory.org/independence-from-spanish-rule-in-the-americas/

The independence of Latin America – Encyclopedia Britannica

The independence of Latin America - Encyclopedia Britannica

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  • Sumary: After three centuries of colonial rule, independence came rather suddenly to most of Spanish and Portuguese America. Between 1808 and 1826 all of Latin America except the Spanish colonies of Cuba and Puerto Rico slipped out of the hands of the…

  • Matching Result: The independence of Latin America ; Europe in the early 19th century created a deep political divide between Spain and its American colonies. In 1807 the Spanish …

  • Intro: history of Latin America – The independence of Latin America After three centuries of colonial rule, independence came rather suddenly to most of Spanish and Portuguese America. Between 1808 and 1826 all of Latin America except the Spanish colonies of Cuba and Puerto Rico slipped out of the hands of…
  • Source: https://www.britannica.com/place/Latin-America/The-independence-of-Latin-America

Causes of the Latin American Revolution – ThoughtCo

Causes of the Latin American Revolution - ThoughtCo

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  • Sumary: Between 1810 and 1825, Spain’s New World Empire collapsed. What caused the Latin American revolution, and why did Spain lose so much, so quickly?

  • Matching Result: Lack of Respect for the Creoles · No Free Trade · Other Revolutions · A Weakened Spain · American Identities · Racism · Final Straw: Napoleon Invades …

  • Intro: What Led Latin America to Seek Independence From Spain? As late as 1808, Spain’s New World Empire stretched from parts of the present-day western U.S. to Tierra del Fuego in South America, from the Caribbean Sea to the Pacific Ocean. By 1825, it was all gone, except for a handful…
  • Source: https://www.thoughtco.com/latin-america-causes-of-independence-2136120

Latin American Revolution: Timeline & Effects | StudySmarter

Latin American Revolution: Timeline & Effects | StudySmarter

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  • Sumary: Latin American Revolution: ✓ Timeline ✓ Effects ✓ Leaders ✓ Summary ✓ Causes ✓ StudySmarter Original

  • Matching Result: The other key cause of the Latin American Revolutions was dissatisfaction with the colonial order, in particular how it placed the colonies as subservient to …

  • Intro: Latin American Revolution: Timeline & Effects Over the first few decades of the 19th century, nearly all of Latin America became independent. In most cases, Latin American Revolutions were led by Creoles. But just who were the Creoles? Learn about the Creoles and the Latin American Revolutions’ causes, their events,…
  • Source: https://www.studysmarter.us/explanations/history/modern-world-history/latin-american-revolution/

Spanish American wars of independence – Wikipedia

Spanish American wars of independence - Wikipedia

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  • Sumary: The Spanish American wars of independence (25 September 1808 – 29 September 1833; Spanish: Guerras de independencia hispanoamericanas) were numerous wars in Spanish America with the aim of political independence from Spanish rule during…

  • Matching Result: A more direct cause of the Spanish American wars of independence were the unique developments occurring within the Kingdom of Spain and its monarchy triggered …

  • Intro: Spanish American wars of independence The Spanish American wars of independence (25 September 1808 – 29 September 1833; Spanish: Guerras de independencia hispanoamericanas) were numerous wars in Spanish America with the aim of political independence from Spanish rule during the early 19th century. These began shortly after the start of…
  • Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spanish_American_wars_of_independence

The South American Revolutions | World Civilizations I (HIS101)

The South American Revolutions | World Civilizations I (HIS101)

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  • Sumary: The Latin American Wars of Independence, which took place during the late 18th and early 19th centuries, were deeply influenced by the American and French Revolutions and resulted in the creation of a number of independent countries in Latin America.

  • Matching Result: The Peninsular War, which resulted from the Napoleonic occupation of Spain, caused Spanish Creoles in Spanish America to question their allegiance to Spain, …

  • Intro: The South American Revolutions | World Civilizations I (HIS101) – Biel The Spread of Revolution The Latin American Wars of Independence, which took place during the late 18th and early 19th centuries, were deeply influenced by the American and French Revolutions and resulted in the creation of a number of…
  • Source: https://courses.lumenlearning.com/suny-fmcc-boundless-worldhistory/chapter/the-south-american-revolutions/

Frequently Asked Questions About how did events in europe lead to revolution in the spanish colonies

If you have questions that need to be answered about the topic how did events in europe lead to revolution in the spanish colonies, then this section may help you solve it.

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The Spanish American Revolution: what led to it?

Napoleon’s invasion of the Iberian Peninsula (Spain and Portugal) in 1807 and 1808 served as the conflict’s immediate cause, but the conflict also had its roots in the growing resentment of Latin American elites of Spanish ancestry who were born under Spanish imperial rule.

What links existed between the revolutions in Latin America and the events in Europe?

Due to their shared desire for independence and approval from their leader(s), the uprisings in Europe and Latin America were connected.

What two things caused the revolutions in Latin America?

The American and French Revolutions had a significant impact on the Latin American Wars of Independence, which took place in the late 18th and early 19th centuries and led to the creation of a number of independent countries in the region.

What four factors led to the revolutions for Latin American independence?

Match

  • -French Revolution inspired ideas. -injustices and repression (committed by royal officials) …
  • -peninsulares and creoles controlled wealth. …
  • -only peninsulares and creoles had power. …
  • -Almost all colonial rule in Latin America ended. …
  • -upper classes kept control of wealth. …
  • -continued to have strong class system.

What were the American Revolution’s three main causes?

The four main factors that contributed to the American Revolution were the Taxation Acts, the Boston Massacre, the Boston Tea Party, and the Intolerable Acts.

What are the primary reasons behind revolutions?

The people who start revolutions have decided the institutions currently in place in society have failed or no longer serve their intended purpose. Typically, revolutions take the form of organized movements aimed at bringing about change—economic change, technological change, political change, or social change.

What developments in Europe influenced Latin American independence movements?

The events of the French Revolution and the Napoleonic Wars had an impact on Haiti and other parts of Latin America, as well as the Mexican War for Independence.

What are the two primary influences of Europe on Latin America?

Native populations were wiped out by war and disease, but Portugal and France also had significant influences on the region, which was largely colonized by Spain.

What encouraged the movement toward independence from Spain?

Some of the direct causes of the wars of independence, which occurred decades later, included the loss of high office to Peninsulars and the revolts in Spanish South America during the eighteenth century. However, both of these events have been regarded as significant components of the political environment in which the wars took place.

Which of the following are the main causes and consequences of revolutions?

In addition to having both positive and negative effects, colonization and political and governmental corruption are the two main important causes of revolution. Many revolutions have been sparked by government corruption; linguistically, the word “corruption” means “utterly broken” when used as an adjective.

What historical occurrence did Spanish colonists take advantage of to achieve independence?

How are Guyana, Suriname, and French Guiana similar? People in Guyana, Suriname, and French Guiana all gained the right to vote. What event did Spanish colonists use to their advantage to gain independence? Spanish colonists used Napoleon’s conquest of Spain.

What was the primary reason for Spanish American independence?

The struggle for independence in Cuba and the sinking of the USS Maine on February 15, 1898, which resulted in the deaths of over 260 of the 354 American crew members, are widely regarded as the primary causes of the Spanish-American War.

What happened to help the Spanish colonial era get started?

Spanish colonization after Columbus accelerated the rivalry between Spain and Portugal to a previously unheard-of level, ushering in an era of aggressive Spanish expansion across the Atlantic.

What two things led to a rise in support for the war against Spain?

There were many causes for the war, but there were two that came into play right away: America’s support for the ongoing resistance to Spanish rule by the Filipinos and Cubans, as well as the mysterious explosion of the battleship USS Maine in Havana Harbor.

Which two factors led the Spanish to colonize the Americas?

Spain’s colonization objectives included converting Native Americans to Christianity, extracting gold and silver from the Americas to boost the Spanish economy and make Spain a more powerful nation.

What are the two factors that allowed the Spanish to subjugate the American civilizations?

In addition to having horses, dogs, guns, and swords, the Spanish were able to defeat the Inca and the Aztec in part because they brought with them germs that made many native Americans ill. The natives were unaware of diseases like smallpox and measles, so they lacked immunity to them.

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