10 how do plants metabolize the sugars they produce by photosynthesis? Ideas

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s Need Sugars and What They Do With them – Botanicare

Plant carbohydrates, in the form of sugars are the energy source by which all plants carry out their major functions. All plants must photosynthesize, transpire and respire to survive. Sugar plays a vital role in all of these.

How They are Made

Simple sugars are made by plants through the process of photosynthesis. Plants take in light from the sun (or through artificial means) through openings in their leaves known as stomata and join together with water from the soil, carbon dioxide from the air and chlorophyll from within the plant, to create sugars in their leaves at sites known as chloroplasts. The same process occurs in aquatic plants, but they obtain their carbon dioxide from the water instead of the air. The by-product of this process is the oxygen that we breathe. Leaves in plants are akin to factories which create the vital components for plant survival. These factories create glucose. From there the sugar is mixed with water that the plant has absorbed through its roots and is transported throughout the plant via its vascular system.

Phloem, is like a botanical superhighway. The plant’s phloem transports the dissolved sugars from the leaves and takes them to various storage sites throughout the plants, like roots or tubers, known as “sinks”. The phloem off-loads its sugary cargo to these sinks across cell membranes through a process known as active transport. As much as 80 percent of the sugars created through the photosynthesis process are delivered to the plant’s sinks.

What They Do for the Plant

Sugars within the plant are responsible for affecting plant growth. The sugars produced in the leaves send the signal to trigger the transition between the juvenile phases of the plant to the adult one. Sugars are needed at all stages from seed, to cotyledon stage, to leaf development, stem development, fruit development and all stages in between. They (the sugars) further play a role in establishing the ratio of a plant’s below ground growth and above ground growth (roots to shoots). In addition to the regulation of growth, the sugars are also responsible for developing some of the plant’s structures. Plant cellulose, the fibrous materials in plants’ cell walls is made up of sugars as are the tubers of some plants, like potatoes.

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Leaves in plants are akin to factories which create the vital components for plant survival.

Sugars are also used by the plant to regulate its time cycles. Plants, like all living things are subject to circadian rhythms which trigger when to “wake up” and when it’s time to “go to bed.” When needed, the simpler sugars (glucose) are converted to more complex sugars in the form of starches, made up of hundreds or thousands of sugar molecules, which a plant uses during the night when it is unable to undergo photosynthesis or later on when needed to form tissue or cell walls.

Plant sugars are also thought to regulate the time of year that a particular species flowers. Levels of sugar within the plant increase in response to the energy consumption required to flower, but some researchers believe that they may also be the cause of the species’ blooms and bloom times.

The process that allows for all of these actions is respiration. During respiration, the plant takes those sugars from the sinks and “burns” them to create the energy needed for growth and metabolism. This process happens independent of light, unlike photosynthesis.

In the third vital process of plant functions, transpiration, sugars are redistributed through the plant. To effect this, water that is absorbed through the plant’s roots, is mixed with the sugars, and then delivered throughout the plant before the excess water leaves the surface of the plant through evaporation. As much as 90 percent of all of the water a plant absorbs is dedicated to this process.

Plant Trickery Using Sugars

Plants use their sugars as a lure to animals to ensure their own survivability. This is done in a few different ways. Carnivorous plants often use not only their coloration, but also their sugars in the form of nectar to lure unsuspecting insects to their deaths. They then of course digest these insects to supplement their own nutritional needs. Plants also cleverly use their sugars to attract animals, including humans to aid in seed dispersal to survive. Fruit-bearing plants convert glucose into fructose, which is the natural sugar that gives most fruits their sweetness. This sweetness attracts a wide variety of animals to eat of their fruit, and through the animals’ natural digestive processes, they disperse the seeds in their manure which provides a protected site to germinate and provides some of the nutrition needed during development. Even if the animals don’t consume the fruit’s seeds, they are just as likely to scatter the seeds by dropping the fruit remains on the ground away from the site where the fruit was grown (think tossing an apple core or peach pit).

Sucrose is a more complex natural sugar that plants make combining both glucose and fructose. Common table sugar is made from the sucrose of sugar cane. This plant does not live in fear of being endangered any time in the near future as it produces one of mankind’s most sought after substances.

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Why Plants Need Sugars and What They Do With them

Why Plants Need Sugars and What They Do With them

  • Author: botanicare.com

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  • Sumary: Plant carbohydrates, in the form of sugars are the energy source by which all plants carry out their major functions. All plants must photosynthesize, transpire and respire to survive. Sugar plays a vital role in…

  • Matching Result: Simple sugars are made by plants through the process of photosynthesis. … The sugars produced in the leaves send the signal to trigger the transition …

  • Intro: Why Plants Need Sugars and What They Do With them – BotanicarePlant carbohydrates, in the form of sugars are the energy source by which all plants carry out their major functions. All plants must photosynthesize, transpire and respire to survive. Sugar plays a vital role in all of these.How They…
  • Source: https://www.botanicare.com/hydro-101/why-plants-need-sugars-and-what-they-do-with-them/

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An Overview of Sucrose Synthases in Plants – Frontiers

An Overview of Sucrose Synthases in Plants - Frontiers

  • Author: frontiersin.org

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  • Sumary: Sucrose is the end product of photosynthesis and the primary sugar transported in the phloem of most plants. Sucrose synthase (SuSy) is a glycosyl transferase enzyme that plays a key role…

  • Matching Result: by O Stein · 2019 · Cited by 261 — Sucrose synthase (SuSy) is a glycosyl transferase enzyme that plays a key role in sugar metabolism, primarily in sink tissues.

  • Intro: An Overview of Sucrose Synthases in Plants Introduction Photosynthesis carried out by plants, algae and cyanobacteria is the major source of fixed carbon for all life on earth. In plant photosynthesis, carbon dioxide is fixed in the chloroplasts via the Calvin cycle to yield triose phosphates (triose-P). Triose-P can be…
  • Source: https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fpls.2019.00095/full

Sugar Transport in Plants: Phloem | Organismal Biology

Sugar Transport in Plants: Phloem | Organismal Biology

  • Author: organismalbio.biosci.gatech.edu

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  • Sumary: The information below was adapted from OpenStax Biology 30.5

  • Matching Result: Sugars move from “source” to “sink”. Plants need an energy source to grow. In growing plants, photosynthates (sugars produced by photosynthesis) are produced in …

  • Intro: Sugar Transport in Plants: Phloem  Learning Objectives Differentiate between sugar sources and sugar sinks in plant tissues Explain the pressure flow model for sugar translocation in phloem tissue Describe the roles of proton pumps, co-transporters, and facilitated diffusion in the pressure flow model Recognize how different sugar concentrations at sources…
  • Source: https://organismalbio.biosci.gatech.edu/nutrition-transport-and-homeostasis/plant-transport-processes-ii/

How are Cellular Respiration and Photosynthesis Related?

How are Cellular Respiration and Photosynthesis Related?

  • Author: scienceline.ucsb.edu

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  • Sumary: During photosynthesis, a plant is able to convert solar energy into a chemical form. It does this by capturing light coming from the sun and, through a series of reactions, using its energy to help build asugar molecule called glucose.

  • Matching Result: Releases energy from the sugar. Plants can do both. When they have light, they use it as an energy source to put the pieces of CO2 and H …

  • Intro: UCSB Science LineAnswer 1:During photosynthesis, a plant is able to convert solar energy into a chemical form. It does this by capturing light coming from the sun and, through a series of reactions, using its energy to help build asugar molecule called glucose. Glucose is made of six carbon atoms,…
  • Source: http://scienceline.ucsb.edu/getkey.php?key=153

Photosynthesis and Metabolism – Nutrition

Photosynthesis and Metabolism – Nutrition

  • Author: openoregon.pressbooks.pub

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  • Sumary: As we just learned in the previous section, cells are the most basic building blocks of life. Cells make up your tissues, organs, and ultimately, you as a human being. And every one of those cells needs energy…

  • Matching Result: Many items are less obviously derived from plants: virtually every spice and flavoring in the spice aisle was produced by a plant as a leaf, root, bark, flower, …

  • Intro: Science and Everyday Application, v. 1.0 Photosynthesis and Metabolism As we just learned in the previous section, cells are the most basic building blocks of life. Cells make up your tissues, organs, and ultimately, you as a human being. And every one of those cells needs energy to perform their…
  • Source: https://openoregon.pressbooks.pub/nutritionscience/chapter/3b-photosynthesis-and-metabolism/

What is Photosynthesis |

What is Photosynthesis |

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  • Sumary: When you get hungry, you grab a snack from your fridge or pantry. But what can plants do when they get hungry? You are probably aware that plants need sunlight, water, and a home (like soil) to grow, but where…

  • Matching Result: Rather, plants use sunlight, water, and the gases in the air to make glucose, which is a form of sugar that plants need to survive. This process …

  • Intro: What is Photosynthesis When you get hungry, you grab a snack from your fridge or pantry. But what can plants do when they get hungry? You are probably aware that plants need sunlight, water, and a home (like soil) to grow, but where do they get their food? They make…
  • Source: https://ssec.si.edu/stemvisions-blog/what-photosynthesis

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Frequently Asked Questions About how do plants metabolize the sugars they produce by photosynthesis?

If you have questions that need to be answered about the topic how do plants metabolize the sugars they produce by photosynthesis?, then this section may help you solve it.

How does photosynthesis’s metabolism function?

Metabolic pathways can be broadly divided into two categories based on their effects. Photosynthesis, which builds sugars out of smaller molecules, is a “building up,” or anabolic, pathway. In contrast, cellular respiration breaks sugar down into smaller molecules and is a “breaking down,” or catabolic, pathway.

What method do plants employ to create sugar?

With the help of sunlight, water, and carbon dioxide, plants carry out a process known as photosynthesis that yields sugar and oxygen, which is a crucial process for the planet because it removes carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and produces food for humans.

Quiz: How do plants use the sugar they make during photosynthesis?

The energy from the sugars created during photosynthesis is used to create other carbohydrates, proteins, and fats.

What is the metabolic process in plants?

The complex of physical and chemical processes involved in photosynthesis, respiration, and the synthesis and breakdown of organic compounds is referred to as plant metabolism.

Photosynthesis is a type of metabolism, right?

Carbon dioxide is reduced to glucose during the anaerobic, light-dependent process of bacterial photosynthesis, which is used for both biosynthesis and energy production.

How is the glucose created during photosynthesis used?

The three possible uses for the glucose produced during photosynthesis are: converting it into cellulose, a chemical necessary for the growth of plant cells; converting it into starch, a storage molecule that can be converted back to glucose when the plant needs it; and finally, using it directly.

What does a plant do with the excess sugar it makes?

Answer and explanation: Starch, which is food that can be consumed by both plants and animals that eat plants, is a form of extra glucose that plants store in their cell walls, trunks, and roots.

Can you make or break down sugar through photosynthesis?

By using the process of photosynthesis, plants convert water, sunlight, and carbon dioxide into oxygen and simple sugars that the plant uses as fuel, making them autotrophs, or producers of their own food.

Does sugar undergo photosynthesis’ breakdown?

In cellular respiration, oxygen is used to break down glucose, releasing chemical energy and heat in the process. In photosynthesis, solar energy is harvested as chemical energy in a process that converts water and carbon dioxide to glucose.

How are excess sugars stored by plants?

Both glycogen and starch are polysaccharides, and plants store excess sugar in them.

What two things are created when a plant converts sugar into energy?

Both plants and animals participate in this process, which results in the release of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), which serves as energy.

What happens to the extra sugar the plant produces?

The plant stores extra glucose it produces in the form of starch.

What is the process by which energy is released after sugars are broken down?

The energy released during the reaction is captured by the energy-carrying molecule ATP (adenosine triphosphate). During cellular respiration, glucose is broken down in the presence of oxygen to produce carbon dioxide and water.

What is the mechanism by which sugar is metabolized to produce energy?

The stages of cellular respiration include glycolysis, pyruvate oxidation, the citric acid or Krebs cycle, and oxidative phosphorylation. Cellular respiration is a metabolic pathway that breaks down glucose and produces ATP.

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