10 what tool do they use to break your water Ideas

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sac

Amniotic sac
Human fetus 10 weeks with amniotic sac - therapeutic abortion.jpg

10-week-old human fetus surrounded by amniotic fluid within the amniotic sac

Anatomical terminology

[edit on Wikidata]

This article is about two of the layers of the fetal membranes and their contents. For the other layers, see Fetal membranes.

The amniotic sac, also called the bag of waters[1][2] or the membranes,[3] is the sac in which the embryo and later fetus develops in amniotes. It is a thin but tough transparent pair of membranes that hold a developing embryo (and later fetus) until shortly before birth. The inner of these membranes, the amnion, encloses the amniotic cavity, containing the amniotic fluid and the embryo. The outer membrane, the chorion, contains the amnion and is part of the placenta. On the outer side, the amniotic sac is connected to the yolk sac, the allantois, and via the umbilical cord, the placenta.[4]

The yolk sac, amnion, chorion, and allantois are the four extraembryonic membranes that lie outside of the embryo and are involved in providing nutrients and protection to the developing embryo.[5] They form from the inner cell mass; the first to form is the yolk sac followed by the amnion which grows over the developing embryo. The amnion remains an important extraembryonic membrane throughout prenatal development. The third membrane is the allantois, and the fourth is the chorion which surrounds the embryo after about a month and eventually fuses with the amnion.[6]

Amniocentesis is a medical procedure where fluid from the sac is sampled during fetal development, between 15 and 20 weeks of pregnancy, to be used in prenatal diagnosis of chromosomal abnormalities and fetal infections.[7]

Structure[edit]

Amniotic cavity in human embryo 1.3 mm. long

The amniotic cavity is the closed sac between the embryo and the amnion, containing the amniotic fluid. The amniotic cavity is formed by the fusion of the parts of the amniotic fold, which first makes its appearance at the cephalic extremity and subsequently at the caudal end and sides of the embryo. As the amniotic fold rises and fuses over the dorsal aspect of the embryo, the amniotic cavity is formed.[citation needed]

Development[edit]

At the beginning of the second week, a cavity appears within the inner cell mass, and when it enlarges, it becomes the amniotic cavity. The floor of the amniotic cavity is formed by the epiblast. Epiblast migrates between the epiblastic disc and trophoblast. In this way the epiblastic cells migrate between the embryoblast and trophoblast. The floor is formed by the epiblast which later on transforms to ectoderm while the remaining cells which are present between the embryoblast and trophoblast are called amnioblasts (flattened cells). These cells are also derived from epiblast which is transformed into ectoderm.[citation needed]

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The amniotic cavity is surrounded by an extraembryonic membrane, called the amnion. As the implantation of the blastocyst progresses, a small space appears in the embryoblast, which is the primordium of the amniotic cavity. Soon, amniogenic (amnion-forming cells) called amnioblasts separate from the epiblast and line the amnion, which encloses the amniotic cavity.[8]

The epiblast forms the floor of the amniotic cavity and is continuous peripherally with the amnion. The hypoblast forms the roof of the exocoelomic cavity and is continuous with the thin exocoelomic membrane. This membrane along with hypoblast forms the primary yolk sac. The embryonic disc now lies between the amniotic cavity and the primary yolk sac. Cells from the yolk sac endoderm form a layer of connective tissue, the extraembryonic mesoderm, which surrounds the amnion and yolk sac.[citation needed]

Birth[edit]

If, after birth, the complete amniotic sac or big parts of the membrane remain coating the newborn, this is called a caul.

When seen in the light, the amniotic sac is shiny and very smooth, but tough.

Once the baby is pushed out of the mother’s uterus, the umbilical cord, placenta, and amniotic sac are pushed out in the after birth.

  • The amniotic sac opened during afterbirth examination

    The amniotic sac opened during afterbirth examination

Function[edit]

The amniotic sac and its filling provide a liquid that surrounds and cushions the fetus. It is a site of exchange of essential substances, such as oxygen, between the umbilical cord and the fetus.[9] It allows the fetus to move freely within the walls of the uterus.[citation needed] Buoyancy is also provided.

Clinical significance[edit]

Chorioamnionitis is inflammation of the amniotic sac (chorio- + amnion + -itis), usually because of infection. It is a risk factor for neonatal sepsis.

During labor, the amniotic sac must break so that the child can be born. This is known as rupture of membranes (ROM). Normally, it occurs spontaneously at full term either during or at the beginning of labor. A premature rupture of membranes (PROM) is a rupture of the amnion that occurs prior to the onset of labor. An artificial rupture of membranes (AROM), also known as an amniotomy, may be clinically performed using an amnihook or amnicot in order to induce or to accelerate labour.

The amniotic sac has to be punctured to perform amniocentesis.[10][11] This is fairly routine procedure, but can lead to infection of the amniotic sac in a very small number of cases.[12] Infection more commonly arises vaginally.[12][13]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Freshwater, Dawn; Masiln-Prothero, Sian (22 May 2013). Blackwell’s Nursing Dictionary. ISBN 978-1-118-69087-1. Retrieved 11 March 2016.
  2. ^ “Definition of BAG OF WATERS”. www.merriam-webster.com. Retrieved 6 October 2021.
  3. ^ “Premature rupture of membranes: MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia”. medlineplus.gov. Retrieved 6 October 2021.
  4. ^ Larsen, WJ (2001). Human Embryology (3rd ed.). Churchill Livingstone. p. 40. ISBN 0-443-06583-7.
  5. ^ Wolpert (2015). Principles of development (Fifth ed.). Oxford, United Kingdom. p. 666. ISBN 978-0-19-967814-3.
  6. ^ Carlson, Bruce M. (2014). “Placenta and Extraembryonic Membranes”. Human Embryology and Developmental Biology. pp. 117–135. doi:10.1016/B978-1-4557-2794-0.00007-3. ISBN 978-1-4557-2794-0.
  7. ^ “Amniocentesis”. nhs.uk. 20 October 2017. Retrieved 6 October 2021.
  8. ^ Moore, Keith L. (2020). The developing human : clinically oriented embryology (Eleventh ed.). Edinburgh. p. 37. ISBN 9780323611541.
  9. ^ Jarzembowski, J.A. (2014). “Normal Structure and Function of the Placenta”. Pathobiology of Human Disease. pp. 2308–2321. doi:10.1016/b978-0-12-386456-7.05001-2. ISBN 978-0-12-386457-4.
  10. ^ Wilde, Colin; Out, Dorothée; Johnson, Sara; Granger, Douglas A. (2013). “Sample Collection, Including Participant Preparation and Sample Handling”. The Immunoassay Handbook. pp. 427–440. doi:10.1016/b978-0-08-097037-0.00029-4. ISBN 978-0-08-097037-0.
  11. ^ Carlson, Bruce M. (2014). “Fetal Period and Birth”. Human Embryology and Developmental Biology. pp. 453–472. doi:10.1016/b978-1-4557-2794-0.00018-8. ISBN 978-1-4557-2794-0.
  12. ^ a b Jefferson, Kimberly K. (2012). “The Bacterial Etiology of Preterm Birth”. Advances in Applied Microbiology Volume 80. Advances in Applied Microbiology. Vol. 80. pp. 1–22. doi:10.1016/b978-0-12-394381-1.00001-5. ISBN 978-0-12-394381-1. PMID 22794142.
  13. ^ Ariel, I.; Singer, D.B. (2014). “Placental Pathologies – Intrauterine Infections”. Pathobiology of Human Disease. pp. 2360–2376. doi:10.1016/b978-0-12-386456-7.05007-3. ISBN 978-0-12-386457-4.

External links[edit]

  • https://www.mun.ca/biology/scarr/Amniotic_egg.html
  • http://staff.um.edu.mt/acus1/IMPLANTATION.htm

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Frequently Asked Questions About what tool do they use to break your water

If you have questions that need to be answered about the topic what tool do they use to break your water, then this section may help you solve it.

What equipment do I have to break my water?

Embryonic hook

Does breaking water artificially hurt?

No, it shouldn’t hurt when your waters break or when they are broken for you. The amniotic sac, which is the part that ‘breaks’ doesn’t have pain receptors, which are the things that cause you to feel pain. “My waters didn’t break of their own accord so I had them broken for me while in hospital.

How dilated do you need to be in order to break your water?

Your doctor may advise manually bursting the bag of waters if your cervix appears to be progressing slowly (or not at all) and your water (also known as an “amniotic sac,” “bag of waters,” or “membranes”) hasn’t broken on its own when you get to the hospital.

How is your water broken during induction?

A procedure known as an amniotomy involves inserting a thin, plastic hook through the cervix to break the amniotic sac, allowing the fluids to exit, in the event that the water does not break naturally during labor.

Can you dilate more after breaking your water?

Your uterus may contract as a result of rupturing or breaking your amniotic sac, which can aid in dilating your cervix.

Does delivery speed up after breaking water?

According to a comprehensive review of studies, intentionally breaking the water during labor, also known as amniotomy, involves rupturing the amniotic membranes to speed up contractions but has no effect on labor duration or baby health.

Can you dilate more after breaking your water?

If amniotomy is not performed, the sac will typically spontaneously rupture during active labor (anytime between the first signs of labor and delivery), but breaking the bag of waters allows the head to apply more direct pressure on the cervix to encourage dilation.

How soon after a doctor induces labor does a baby arrive?

Although not all medical professionals agree that the 24-hour rule is necessary, many hospitals choose to follow this guideline. Many doctors and midwives will want to deliver the baby within 24 hours after a pregnant woman’s water breaks.

Does an induction hurt?

According to the type of induction you are having, this could range from discomfort with the procedure to more intense and prolonged contractions as a result of the medication you have been given. Induced labor is typically more painful than natural labor.

After induction, how long do you remain in the hospital?

Your partner may stay with you overnight, but it is not required. Mechanical dilation with a balloon catheter and oral Misoprostol medications are two of our most common techniques for ripening. You will stay overnight and continue the induction in the morning, as described below.

How soon after Pitocin is started do you deliver?

Response time varies; some women experience mild contractions shortly after starting Pitocin; this is more likely if you have previously given birth; however, many women require 6–12 hours or more of Pitocin before entering active labor (when the cervix dilates at least a centimeter per hour).

What happens if you are induced but don’t dilate?

When you’re ready to start labor, your cervix typically will open up on its own. However, if your cervix doesn’t show any signs of dilating and effacing (softening, opening, or thinning) to permit your baby to leave the uterus and enter the birth canal, your doctor will need to start the ripening process.

How soon after induction do babies arrive?

It may take up to 48 hours to go into labor, but once it does, everything should go according to plan.

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